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Online Presentations:

The Dangers of Wi Fi in Schools

Electropollution and Cancer

Local Presentations:

“Southern Belize in the Ancient Maya World: Recent Research at the Classic Sites of Nim li Punit, Lubaantun and Pusilha”

September 16, 8:00 PM – Public Institute of Maya Studies Presentation

With Geoffrey E. Braswell, of the University of California, San Diego

The four major Maya sites of Southern Belize – Lubaantun, Nim li Punit, Uxbenka and Pusilha – are often said to form an archaeological region, distinct from other parts of the Classic Maya world but fully integrated with it. Political and economic relations among these sites, as well as with important distant centers such as Copan, Quirigua and Caracol, are the subjects of this presentation. The data to be discussed are drawn from surveys and excavations conducted during the past 15 years throughout the region. The discovery of three tombs – one Early, one Late, and one Terminal Classic in date at Pusilha and Nim li Punit – provide especially important insights into ancient interaction. Added bonus: A new find, the discovery at Nim li Punit of a large carved jade pectoral with an extensive hieroglyphic text, will be presented for the first time in the United States.
IMS Maya Hotline: 305-279-8110.
Subscribe to the full-color e-mailed version of our monthly IMS Explorer newsletter at: www.instituteofmayastudies.org

“The Mesoamerican Ballgame and Its Architectural Settings: A Three Millennia Tradition”

May 20, 8:00 PM – Public Institute of Maya Studies Presentation

Dr. Éric Taladoire, Prof. of Precolumbian Archaeology at the University of Paris
The ballgame is one of the oldest traditions of Mesoamerica: the first known ballcourt dates 1200 BCE, and the game is still alive in several regions of western Mexico. Far from its sportive aspect, the game is deeply rooted in Mesoamerican thought and cosmology. Up to now, more than 2000 ballcourts have been registered all over the cultural area, while representations of ballcourts can be found in pictographic manuscripts, in rock art, and in offerings. In the Maya area, playing was one of the king’s responsibilities, while, in the Mexica Empire, the game was a substitute for war. The ballgame obviously underwent many changes and meanings according to the different civilizations that practiced it over time, but the available data allow asserting that it maintained, throughout its long-lasting existence, the same basic symbolism.

The Institute of Maya Studies (IMS) meets at the Miami Science Museum,
3280 South Miami Avenue, across from Vizcaya;
Maya Hotline: 305-279-8110.
www.instituteofmayastudies.org

Ancient Skywatchers of the Eastern Woodlands – Cahokia Mounds Winter Lecture Series

March 22, 2:00 PM – Cahokia Mounds Center

William Romain, PhD, The Ancient Earthworks Project
Dr. Romain’s presentation chronicles a five-thousand year-old tradition of Native American skywatching. Using state-of-the-art LiDAR imagery and archaeoastronomic assessment protocols, he documents celestial alignments of representative sites from the Archaic, Woodland, and Mississippian periods. This includes the sites of Watson Brake, Poverty Point, Newark Earthworks, Mound City, Serpent Mound, Angel Mounds, and Moundville. Of special interest, the great city of Cahokia is shown to be designed using nested squares, a special unit of length, and alignments to the moon. He also explores certain design principles held in common across the region and significant trends through time.
Cahokia Mounds Center
Collinsville, Illinois
http://ancientearthworksproject.org/1/post/2015/01/cahokia-winter-lecture-series.html

The Myth of Clovis First: the Peopling of the Americas – Public Institute of Maya Studies Presentation

March 18, 8:00 PM – Miami Science Museum

with D. Clark Wernecke Ph.D. of The Gault School of Archaeological Research (GSAR) and Texas State University

Since a Spanish priest proposed in the 16th century that primitive peoples walked to the New World, we have honed and tweaked a hypothesis of the Peopling of the New World that has never made much sense and has very little evidence. Dr. Wernecke will take you through that old hypothesis step-by-step and then present recent evidence and new hypotheses for this process. Last, he will present evidence from the GSAR excavation of one of the largest Paleoindian sites excavated in the Americas – the Gault Site in Central Texas.

D. Clark Wernecke: “Archaeology is not so much a career as a calling – you have to really want to participate, learn and explore every day. I love what I do, enjoy the people I work with, and learn something new every day. I jokingly like to describe my profession in archaeology as ‘CSI: Prehistoric’.”

The Institute of Maya Studies (IMS) meets at the Miami Science Museum,
3280 South Miami Avenue, across from Vizcaya;
Maya Hotline: 305-279-8110

Of Ceramics and Religion: The Emerald Site – Rebecca M. Barzilai–Research

March 13, 4:00 PM – Glenn Black Lab

The Emerald Site in Lebanon, IL, is a constructed Mississippian mound center where everyday practices were entangled with the performance of Mississippian religion. This presentation will focus on ceramic analyses of materials from recent excavations at the site and will investigate how style and composition of ceramics inform us about the ways in which Late Woodland (circa AD 950-1000) and Mississippian (circa AD 1000-1050) peoples from Illinois, Indiana, and perhaps further afield, were interacting with each other at the Emerald Site. Based on her dissertation research, Barzilai will discuss how ceramic analysis illustrates interactions between diverse peoples at the Emerald Site and the role these people have in the rise of Cahokia as the largest Pre-Columbian mound center north of Mexico.

Glenn Beck Laboratory of Archaeology
University of Indiana
Bloomington, Illinois
http://gbl.indiana.edu/everyone/events/

She Gives Birth: Reproductive Strategizing in Precolumbian Maya Culture – Public Institute of Maya Studies Presentation

February 18, 8:00 PM – Pamela Geller, University of Miami

For much of human history, reproductive strategizing, or the enhancing or suppressing of fertility through varied means, has been practiced as a means of controlling the production of offspring and women’s health. As an example, I discuss reproductive strategies utilized by the Precolumbian Maya. Drawing from ethnographic, ethnohistoric and archaeological evidence, I illumine ancient practices tied to fertility (or its avoidance) that greatly allowed for greater autonomy over and autonomy of the female body. Special attention is paid to the role of midwives, their technical skills, and repository of sacred knowledge, which Maya women have relied on for millennia. The Maya example debunks certain commonsensical notions about past and contemporary women: 1) they have been slaves to their biology, namely their abilities to carry, bear, and nurse children; 2) modern medicine saved them from childbirth’s imminent and unavoidable risks; and 3) their sexual relationships.

The Institute of Maya Studies (IMS) meets at the Miami Science Museum,
3280 South Miami Avenue, across from Vizcaya;

Maya Hotline: 305-279-8110

Subscribe to the full-color e-mailed version of our monthly IMS Explorer newsletter at:
www.instituteofmayastudies.org

Public Institute of Maya Studies Presentation: Origins of Maya Civilization Viewed from Ceibal, Guatemala

January 21, 8:00 PM: – Takeshi Inomata, University of Arizona

Our recent investigations at Ceibal, Guatemala, documented the earliest ceremonial complex in the Maya lowlands, dating to the Middle Preclassic period (1000-350 BCE). Our chronological study demonstrates that Ceibal was founded before the Olmec center of La Venta became a dominant power, and thus its beginning cannot be explained in terms of direct influence from La Venta. Still, the formal complex of Ceibal shows close similarities to contemporaneous buildings in Chiapas, suggesting that inter-regional interactions played an important role.

Takeshi Inomata is Professor of Anthropology, Director of Graduate Studies at the University of Arizona. He is an archaeologist who studies Maya civilization, social change, warfare, architecture, and ceramics.

The Institute of Maya Studies (IMS) meets at the Miami Science Museum,
3280 South Miami Avenue, across from Vizcaya

Maya Hotline: 305-279-8110

Institute of Maya Studies Presentation: The Holmul Kingdom and the Rise of a Maya Empire with Dr. Francisco Estrada-Belli

October 15, 8:00 PM – Miami Science Museum

The discovery of a spectacularly decorated and inscribed building at Holmul recently brought this site to the forefront of Classic Maya history. These finds come to fill perhaps the largest gap in our knowledge of it, the sixth century CE. This was a time of great turmoil in the lowlands. It has been referred to as the “Tikal Hiatus” because of the dearth of historical texts at Tikal and elsewhere. New information is now revealing the existence of a royal lineage at Holmul with connections to both Tikal and the Kaan kingdom and the role it played during the initial phase of their long-lasting confrontation.
Francisco Estrada-Belli is Adjunct Professor at Tulane University, Research Associate at American Museum of Natural History, and President of Maya Archaeology Initiative.

The Institute of Maya Studies meets at the Miami Science Museum,
3280 South Miami Avenue, across from Vizcaya;
Maya Hotline: 305-279-8110.
Subscribe to the full-color e-mailed version of our monthly IMS Explorer newsletter at:
www.instituteofmayastudies.org

Institute of Maya Studies Presentation: “Early E-Groups and the Development of the Maya Calendar” with Dr. Susan Milbrath, Florida Museum of Natural History, University of Florida

September 17, 8:00 PM – British Museum Gallery

This lecture explores the changing nature of calendar records in Mesoamerica, with a special focus on the solar cycle. Maya E-groups reflect significant solar alignments during the Middle to Late Preclassic, at a time that calendar records were first being developed.

The Institute of Maya Studies meets at the Miami Science Museum,
3280 South Miami Avenue, across from Vizcaya;
Maya Hotline: 305-279-8110.
Subscribe to the full-color e-mailed version of our monthly IMS Explorer newsletter at:
www.instituteofmayastudies.org

New Views on the Intersection of Oneota and Mississippian Worlds

September 10, 7:00 PM – ISM Research & Collections Center

Presented by Dr. Jodie A. O’Gorman, Associate Professor and Chair of Anthropology, Michigan State University

Understanding the larger social context for elevated levels of violence that have been documented for late prehistory in the Central Illinois River Valley has been the over-arching goal guiding research at the Morton Village excavations for the past seven years. The question of who lived at the village will be evaluated with new evidence, and the social contexts for interactions leading to conflict and cooperation examined. Drawing on field work conducted by Dr.

O’Gorman and Dr. Michael Conner of Dickson Mounds Museum, the presentation will consider community structure, architecture, ritual, foodways, and more.

ISM Research & Collections Center,
1011 East Ash Street (enter the building from 10 ½ Street between Ash & Laurel Streets),
Springfield, Illinois
http://www.museum.state.il.us/ismsites/rcc/events.html?EventID=2335

Institute of Maya Studies Presentation: Centipedes in the Art and Iconography of the Ancient Maya

August 20, 8:00 PM – Miami Science Museum

Featuring IMS Explorer newsletter editor Jim Reed

Over the past decade, Maya scholars have begun to agree that a lot of the imagery on Maya ceramics and stone sculpture that was originally thought to be snake imagery is actually centipede imagery. Mayanists Nikolai Grube, Karl Taube, Erik Boot, Michael Grofe and Nicholas Hellmuth have led the way in scholarly research and their insights have helped to put centipedes in their proper light. Of interest, scientists report that a peptide found in centipede venom could prove more powerful than morphine in treating all types of pain, including pain caused by nerve damage, cancer and surgery. Jim Reed will explain the story of why centipedes were so important to the ancient Maya.

The Institute of Maya Studies meets at the Miami Science Museum
3280 South Miami Avenue, across from Vizcaya
Maya Hotline: 305-279-8110

www.instituteofmayastudies.org

Tulum and Coastal Cities – Ray Stewart – Institute of Maya Studies Ancient Maya Cities Series Presentation

August 13, 8:00 PM – Miami Science Museum

The coast of the Yucatan peninsula played an important economic, political and communication role in ancient Maya history, especially in the Postclassic period. Evidence of this importance are the numerous Maya ruins that dot the famous Maya Riviera Coast of the Mexican state of Quintana Roo, facing the Caribbean sea.

The Institute of Maya Studies meets at the Miami Science Museum,
3280 South Miami Avenue, across from Vizcaya;
Maya Hotline: 305-279-8110.
Subscribe to the full-color e-mailed version of our monthly IMS Explorer newsletter at:
www.instituteofmayastudies.org

Institute of Maya Studies Presentation: “Dawn of the Maya, a film by National Geographic”

July 16, 8:00 PM – Miami Science Museum

Deep in the jungles of Guatemala, archaeologists are uncovering astounding evidence of an early Maya civilization – one that was flourishing before the time of Christ. Clues to a lost dynasty of kings, a breathtaking mural, a monumental mask, what may be the biggest pyramid ever built… these discoveries are pushing back the clock by more than two millennia, revealing the origins of Maya civilization. This beautiful movie explores how the Preclassic Maya lived and ruled before 200 CE.

Miami Science Museum
3280 South Miami Avenue, across from Vizcaya;
Maya Hotline: 305-279-8110

SAR Colloquium: “Re-connecting the Past: Network Approaches to Regional Interaction in the Archaeology of the Late Prehispanic Southwest”

July 16, 12:00 PM – School for Advanced Research Santa Fe, New Mexico

Barbara J. Mills, Professor, School of Anthropology, University of Arizona, Tucson, and Cotsen Summer Scholar

This presentation addresses how network analyses are being used by archaeologists in the Southwest to understand the dynamics of social interactions in the past. Data from the Southwest Social Networks Project are used to show how migration transformed social connections in the western Southwest from A.D. 1200-1500, and how network models and methods provide insights into this tumultuous period. The results of these analyses show who was more connected to whom and how new networks emerged as a result of multiple long- and short-distance migrations. These analyses provide a platform for extending research into still earlier periods and especially the Chaco World, from A.D. 800 to 1200.

School for Advanced Research (SAR)
660 Garcia St
Santa Fe, New Mexico

http://sarweb.org/index.php?colloquium_mills

Institute of Maya Studies Ancient Maya Cities Series Presentation: “Ancient Maya Cities with Mural Paintings”

July 9, 8:00 PM – Miami Science Museum

Dr. Anne Stewart:

Many ancient Maya cities had murals. Just how did they paint them, what was the basis of the pigments, and what was the subject matter that was presented? We will be looking not only at the well-documented surviving murals at sites such as Bonampak and San Bartolo, but also examples encountered at lesser-known sites, as well as some murals that were recorded by early archaeologists that no longer exist.

The Institute of Maya Studies
Miami Science Museum,
3280 South Miami Avenue, across from Vizcaya;
Maya Hotline: 305-279-8110

Subscribe to the full-color e-mailed version of our monthly IMS Explorer newsletter at:
www.instituteofmayastudies.org