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Ancient History is one of my favorite research topics. I not only love the crazy possibilities for entertainment value, but also, approaching it with an open mind, I get an immense educational value from videos such as this next one.

It’s called The Mystery of the Carpathian Sphinx and the Origins of Man, and I’m trilled to make this post about it. I watched it for the first time only a short time ago, and it covered many ideas I have felt but not heard much said about, and others that were totally new.

Carpathian Sphinx Facing the Setting Sun

It’s written, narrated, directed and edited by Oana R. Ghiocel and features Robert M. Schoch, a Geologist and Professor at Boston University as well as other local experts.

Great Quotes:

“Who is this bearded God, will I ever find out?”

-my thoughts: I wonder if this ties in with the Quetzalcoatl & Viracocha Bearded God Legends from Central and South America.

“Shanidar 1 Skull – 62,000 BC What he discovered was a burial with flowers. He discovered the skeletons of handicapped and old people, so it meant that the Neanderthal had to take care of their sick and their old.”

“It was clearly a cult that believed in immortality, that there was something beyond physical death, that there was something beyond the material existence, there was something that we might call a soul that would continue, that would survive. This is actually not a belief that the ancient Greeks for instance had, but it seems to be a belief that the Neanderthals had.”

“The evidence in the Carpathian Mountains shows that a Neanderthal cave bear ritual is 75,000 years old. The oldest in the world. ”

Full Movie:

Film Transcript:

“This film is dedicated to Nicholas Dimancescu. Nicholas loved Romania’s very ancient history, rich cultural heritage and the pristine beauty of the Carpathian Mountains.”

Narrator:

We can only see as far forward as we remember back. – Old Chinese Wisdom

Stan Gooch:

I don’t know what the future is going to to be, and there may not be a future. There may not be one. It may all end in disaster of one kind or another.

Stan Gooch, British psychologist and author and proponent of a

Narrator:

The Greek historian Plato believed that there had be many great civilizations, that had disappeared in a variety of catastrophes. Today, humanity has forgotten the past. In the human unconscious, there is an extremely powerful force, that acts on an individual, keeping him from seeing with clarity the obvious symptoms of his next death. Only in the last moments are the eyes of the soul opened and man understands his situation and accepts it. The landslide of all the empires, and all the human institutions, is evident as soon as one studies the past.

Why do we believe in a progress without end? Everything dies around us. High atop a vast plateau in the Carpathian Mountains of old Europe, there is an unknown, enigmatic sculptor that strikingly resembles the Great Sphinx of Egypt. For that reason it was named the Carpathian Sphinx. Could there be a link between the Carpathian Sphinx and the Great Sphinx of Egypt? Could the Carpathian Sphinx be the result of a lost civilization?

While living in Boston I go and I check all the library sources I can find. I’m convinced by what I find, I decide to leave the United States and I return to Eastern Europe to the homeland I left 15 years before. The Sphinx was calling me to unravel its hidden story. I had to solve the mystery. Could the Carpathian Mountains and the Sphinx have a central, yet forgotten role in the history of the world?

Around the world on every continent we find evidence of a worldwide very ancient human legacy. Today we have only coded fragments. – Stan Gooch

Robert M. Schoch:

I’m probably best known in certain circles for my work on the Sphinx, I’m only going to mention it very briefly because I feel like I have to, because in many ways it does set the stage for what we’re heard about at this conference, conference on Precession, Ancient Knowledge and really pushing things way back and this work that goes back almost 2 decades now for myself, personally, really set the stage for much of what has come later, and I’m not claiming any credit here, I’m giving credit to the Sphinx. It’s also changed my life. Sometimes I think, usually I think for the better. Sometimes I wonder what I got myself into. So, I really started out the Sphinx work when I was very young. This is me, about 20 years ago, and what it really indicated doing, at least for some people, and this was part of the controversy, part of why where here now, talking about, you know, if you push the date of the Sphinx back, does it mean that we have to view history differently? Do we have to rewrite history?

Dr. Robert M. Schoch of Boston University

Narrator:

Doctor Robert Schoch, a Geologist from Boston University is an expert in ancient stone. He has studied the Egyptian Sphinx for many, many decades, and he believes that the Egyptian Sphinx is much older than traditionally believed. Dating back many thousands of years before the rise of Egyptian culture.

Robert M. Schoch:

The head was re-carved into the human form that it takes now, parts of the Sphinx itself if you look at it to this day, its been heavily repaired. Some of those repairs go back 4000 and more years, because it was a much more ancient statue, thousands of years earlier. Things were happening in Egypt in a much earlier period then conventional Archeologists, then conventional historians, have ever admitted or suspected.

Narrator:

Doctor Schoch believes that the fundamental ideas and the great knowledge of the Egyptians to be more ancient then the Egyptian Civilization itself.

Dan Braneanu a researcher from Bucharest has spent the last 40 years investigating what he believes is the legacy of a lost civilization. All around the Carpathian Mountains, in the plateau where the Sphinx is located, Dan Braneanu sees great evidence of a lost civilization.

Dan Braneanu:

Translated: Here… see..two eyes, a big nose… here the teeth, smiling… the nose is simple, without nostrils and here probably a process of erosion…

Daniel Ruzo a Peruvian Archeologist and protohistorian from Peru has come to believe that there once had been a great world wide civilization that had been destroyed in a cataclysm. This civilization left marks all over the world, in all the continents. Ruzo found proof in England, in such monuments as Stone Henge, in France in Fontainebleau. Wherever he looked, he found proof. He became aware that this civilization was especially a mountain civilization, that lived on the high peak of the mountains, in all the continents. In 1954, Ruzo discovered Markawasi, a small plateau high atop mountains Andes in Peru. Markawasi up to this date remains a mystery. There are faces here of Women. He called this one the monument to Humanity. Ruzo believed that the monument to Humanity was one of the most important sculptures ever made.

In 1968, Ruzo came to the Carpathian Mountains, in Romania. Here Ruzo, found the proof that he was searching for. Everywhere he looked on the Bucegi Massif in the Carpathian Mountains, he found proof of a very ancient culture. He believed here, was the door to the treasure of a lost people. Ruzo believed that the treasure is not a material one, but a spiritual treasure. Ruzo investigated the area around the Carpathian Sphinx and he found tantalizing proof of this lost civilization here as well.

Daniel Ruzo’s Words:

The Carpathian Sphinx is an ancient monument sculpted before the flood, destroyed in the face, being very corroded by wind and rain.

Ancient Sphinx in Romania

Narrator:

Ruzo concluded that the Carpathian Sphinx, just as the monument to Humanity in Markawasi was an important legacy of a lost people. When he returned to Peru, Ruzo published a book called, The Fantastic History of a Discovery, and in that book he wrote about the trip to Romania. He dedicated a chapter to what he saw in the Carpathian Mountains. And he said, the Romanian Carpathian Mountains were at the center of the oldest European civilization known today. His conclusions were made after he saw the Carpathian Sphinx.

Ruzo died in 1991, before he was able to find this world-wide vanished civilization, but his work paved the road for later research. Ruzo was confident that he was right, and that one day, someone, will clarify the mystery, and fill the empty question marks. Who were these vanished people, that left their imprints in these monuments?

Daniel Ruzo’s Words:

It is in these scared mountains, where people found their salvation after the flood, and where they will be saved when the next catastrophe occurs. It is vital today to find these scared mountains and sacred caves.

Here we are in front of an original sculpture, known all over the world, it has not been reproduced in historical times. Being so used to a 3 dimensional landscape, starting in Sumerian times, we have failed until today to see these sculptures considered made by nature.

Marcian Bleahu’s Words:

The strangest apparition on the plateau is the Sphinx. A huge rock, with an enigmatic profile, around which a protohistorical legend had been formed. The legend says that the Sphinx is a statue made in times long forgotten, by the people of a lost civilization.

Robert M. Schoch:

…There’s a U shape, you can’t tell this from down at the base of the Mountains, its really like a fortress up there.

Narrator:

From a distance, it looks very abrupt, uninviting, with steep rocky areas that are very hard to climb. But the reality of the Mountain is actually something different.

Robert M. Schoch:

Interestingly, once you get up there you get the unexpected. It opens up into a huge plateau.

Narrator:

The Sphinx is at a central point on the plateau. Going south directly from the Sphinx there is a group of enigmatic rocks, called the peaks of longing. From here, in direct line to the North, one can see the Sphinx and then the highest peak, called (inaudible) the peak of the human being.

Robert M. Schoch:

Something that’s very interesting looking at the Sphinx in Romania, looking at the plateau, looking at the surrounding area, is you have these, at high elevation, you have these incredible structures. They can be seen from a very great distance, they certainly seem like markers or sign posts, or something that might attract ancient peoples and I think this is something we have to take very seriously.

Narrator:

Many of the rocks on the plateau have feminine names. This one is called the Big Old Lady Rock. These ones are the old ladies of Cocora Mountain. This is the Mountain of the Old Lady. The (inaudible) valley hides the mountain called the Goddesses Mountain.

The highest peak in Bucegi, facing the North direction, the Peak of the Human Being. This mountain is called the Origin or the Beginning Mountain. The main river flowing down the valley below the Goddesses Mountain was called an (inaudible) which means heavenly one. So the question is, why are all these women’s names in these mountains? And the sacred names, such as the Mountain of the Goddesses, and the Mountain called Human Being? Could there have been here a religious Matriarchal society at one point in time? Could there have been a very ancient feminine worship?

Daniel Ruzo’s Words:

The origin of these names must be discovered, as the myths, as well the sculptures are before the time of the flood. The Sphinx’s multiple profiles, best seen in the changing light. Where do the orbits of the Sphinx point to? Why are there all these figures, especially the ones looking West towards the setting sun. The profile that resembles the Egyptian Sphinx, is looking North. The profile that resembles an (inaudible) face is looking West. Why does one profile look towards the North, and another towards the West? One to the Northern Sky and the other one, towards the setting Sun, why? And where is the door to the treasure? Who is this bearded God, will I ever find out?

The enigmatic faces are only seen from certain points of view. They are best seen with the changing light, the shadows of the Moon and the Sun. Will the Sun point to a secret direction? Ruzo believed these monuments point to the sacred treasure found in caves. And what is the mystery of the gigantic rock, resembling very much a podium or stage? Could this place have been used for some type of performance? For some rituals of a vanished humanity?

A vast crowd could have been in the valley looking up at somebody performing, singing or dancing on the top. Could this be the door to the treasure? Could this relate back to the Sphinx? To the caverns that Daniel Ruzo was talking about? Could the spiritual treasure Daniel was talking about be found in these caves.

This cave is on the mountain called Goddesses Mountain. Could there be any traces here, that would point to a lost civilization?

Daniel Ruzo considered that only an expert could find this door.

Where do I need to look? To find the answers. Could this be an ancient religious center as Daniel Ruzo had concluded? Could there be a spiritual treasure here?

Robert M. Schoch:

Some people think the world of long ago contains a body of great secrets, like some treasure trove of insights that will unlock the universes hidden doors.

Narrator:

Or new, undiscovered technologies that will free us from drudgeries. I doubt that such is the case. The gifts of the ancient world go much deeper.

Robert M. Schoch:

I think when we look for this lost civilization, there may have been lost civilizations, but they were not necessarily, what we expect, or what many people expect, that is, they were not a mirror image in the past of what we are today.

Daniel Ruzo’s Words:

They lived around the mountains and carved into them. They appreciated the natural beauty and had high mental abilities.

Ruzo called them the guardians of an ancient wisdom.

Daniel Ruzo’s Words:

It was a magical work, done by a culture whose science and understanding of the world was different from the present. It was from these people, that we have inherited all our ancient wisdom, our sense of religion, and spirituality.

The world we have today was the legacy of a lost civilization. All the symbolic systems, all the legendary characters, all the myths and the legends do not have the name of the author, we have inherited them from a vanished humanity.

Robert M. Schoch:

If Daniel Ruzo was right about an ancient lost civilization, was this ancient lost civilization, actually what we would now call Neanderthals? So, going back tens of thousands of years into the last ice age.

Narrator:

Could the Neanderthals be the anonymous authors of our legends and myths, of our ancient wisdom? Could the lost civilization that Daniel Ruzo had been searching for his entire life without finding, be the extinct Neanderthal civilization? Is there any valid evidence to support such an original hypothesis?

Born in London to working class parents, and spending most of his days in England and Wales, on the surface, Stan Gooch life may not have seemed exciting, but it was his remarkable intellectual journey that distinguished him as a person, where his legacy lies. In relative isolation Stan Gooch studied the elements of human evolution and the human psyche, and he came to an astonishing conclusion.

Stan Gooch:

We are a hybrid species, we are a cross breed between two very different types of early man Neanderthal and Cro-Magnon.

Narrator:

Gooch authored many books including Total Man, Personality and Evolution, The Neanderthal Question, Guardians of the Ancient Wisdom, and the Double Helix of the Mind. However, Gooch never gained the popular audience, critical acclaim, or monetary remuneration that he had hoped for. Indeed, Gooch became convinced that the establishment was deliberately ignoring him.

By the late 1980’s he had all but given up his studies and writing, and went almost in total seclusion, in the end Gooch did entertain the thought that perhaps, after his death, his contributions might be widely acknowledged. Gooch was convinced that the Neanderthals had been underestimated.

Robert M. Schoch:

For Stan Gooch, Neanderthals were their own species, they had their own culture, they had their own civilization even, he used terms like Cities of Dreams, they built Cities of Dreams, they had a dream culture, they had an advanced sophisticated culture.

Narrator:

Gooch believed, that ancient Moon warship was possessed by the Neanderthals.

Stan Gooch:

Neanderthal was in fact nocturnal, or at least semi-nocturnal. They worshiped the Moon, where as Cro-Magnon was a day light creature. A hunter and whatever, and worshiped the Sun.

Narrator:

The Neanderthals lived in Europe, during the ice age for at least 100,000 years. Neanderthals range included all of Europe and parts of Asia, the Middle East and Levant. During the time of the Neanderthals, in the Carpathian Mountains, there was a high population of cave bears. One of the biggest populations in Europe. There is still a puzzling mystery why Neanderthals went extinct but a number of possible scenarios have been proposed by scientists. Ranging from natural disasters, massive earth quakes and catastrophic volcanic eruptions in Europe, but also human diseases. It is unclear if the Cro-Magnon massively eliminated Neanderthal on purpose, or if they were already doomed. Contrary to popular belief, many Neanderthal populations in Europe had light skin, green eyes and red hair.

Robert M. Schoch:

Typically, people had the concept of Neanderthals as being dark, brutish, ape like, if you would, and the Cro-Magnons, our ancestors, were the light skinned, fair-hared individuals. It may be totally opposite. That, in fact the early archaic Homo Sapiens were much darker than the Neanderthals that they came in contact with in Europe. Gooch predicted this long ago.

Narrator:

Neanderthals were much stronger than modern humans. The body type of a Neanderthal can easily be compared to that of a modern wrestler or body builder. They were not delicate, nor what we would consider beautiful, but surprisingly Neanderthals were highly emotional and a very sensitive bunch. There is strong evidence from their anatomy, suggesting they had a very well developed vocal apparatus, powerful voices, perfect pitch and a more sensitive inner ear than the one of the modern human.

Steve Mithen an archeologist from the UK, think Neanderthals were the most musically developed human species that ever lived. “They were musically inclined, amazing singers, and they were great performers.

Stan Gooch’s Words:

The Neanderthals were a nocturnal species and they worshiped the Moon. They came out at night and performed ceremonies for the Moon Goddess, especially at full Moon or new Moon. Anatomical evidence for a nocturnal lifestyle rests on the Neanderthals very large round eye sockets and very large ear purgers. Large eyes in particular are the special hallmark of a nocturnal creature. The Neanderthals learned how to not fear the darkness, and in the process they fell in love with the nights sky. The Neanderthals worshiped the Northern Sky, they considered that the still center of the heavens was in the North. They worshiped the Northern Constellations, the constellation of the Little Bear and the Big Bear. According to Stan Gooch the cave bear ritual of the neanderthals is the oldest ritual in the world performed by a human species.

Voice of British Writer Colin Wilson:

The Neanderthal may have been far more intelligent than we recognize. Neanderthal man appeared to know far more about the stars for example, than one would suppose, I mean my general picture of Neanderthal is obviously of a shampy ape and Stan argued that in fact, he knew an enormous amount about the heavens, and also about procession of the equinoxes and about all kinds of other things.

Narrator:

Symbolic behavior was central to the Neanderthal culture. Neanderthals made advanced stone tools, cooked their meals and ate vegetables. They wore jewelry and body painting, had their own language system, and live in complex social groups. They collected and preserved crystals and minerals, and probably made figurines. In Stan Gooch’s view, Neanderthals culturally advanced people. Highly civilized in spirit with a deep sense of religion and practiced herbal medicine.

Stan Gooch’s Words:

The Neanderthal society was fully ruled by women, they were the ultimate authority. The Night and Moon Ceremonies of Neanderthal were presided over by Priestesses.

Stan Gooch:

We’ve got the Sun the positive and the Moon the negative, whatever you want to call them. It’s incredible really, and that’s why the Moon and the Sun fascinate so much because they reflect as it were literally, our own duality.

Stan Gooch’s Words:

The Neanderthal society was peaceful, compassionate and loving to one another. Central to their life was religion and magical practices. Neanderthals were what we would call today magicians, also shamans and also wizards.

Stan Gooch’s Words:

Cro-Magnon’s life was rooted in the concept of male ownership, this was a society fully ruled by men, it was a society who worshiped the Sun and lived for day light.

Stan Gooch:

Hunting and producing weapons, things like that, Cro-Magnon was certainly superior, but if you’re talking about knowledge of herbs, then I would say Neanderthal was superior. It depends what you’re talking about.

Robert M. Schoch:

He was interested in things like brain structure, he pointed out rightfully that Neanderthals on average had larger brains than modern humans, but these larger brains were differently arranged, differently proportioned than our modern humans, so for instance a very important point of Gooch, one that he makes over and over in his writings and books, is that Neanderthal brains had larger cerebellums, the brain of humans, be it Neanderthal or modern humans is composed of a cerebrum and a cerebellum, the cerebellum is sometimes referred to as the smaller brain, the lesser brain, its essentially, one could argue, a separate brain, housed inside and underneath, anatomically the rest of the brain. Gooch points out that the cerebellum was larger in Neanderthals. He attributes and I believe rightfully so, based on clinical evidence that the cerebellum is really the seat of many mental abilities, many mental processes, that we to this day have a very poor understanding of, so for instance dreams may originate primarily in the cerebellum, certain types of artistic impulses, religious impulses, impulses of the sacred, certain, we could call loosely philosophical, and psychical impulses.

Stan Gooch:

My view is that Neanderthal and Cro-Magnon crossbred in central Europe some 30,000 to 35,000 or 40,000 years ago.

Narrator:

When Neanderthal and Cro-Magnon interbred, Stan Gooch believes, each side made a unique contribution, at one level this was a cultural cross fertilization, but at a deeper level it was a genetic encounter. Neanderthal contributed our religious genes, while Cro-Magnon contributed our scientific endowment. A project to sequence the Neanderthal Genome took off in 2006 with the participation of the Plank Institute in Zurich, Switzerland and the Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT in Boston.

In May 2010, the genome project revealed shocking results, interbreeding between Neanderthal and Cro-Magnon took place, resulting in from 1 – 4% of the current European population having Neanderthal genes.

Robert M. Schoch:

You have these two cultures meeting, very different world views, essentially a duality, the scientific on the one hand, the religious on the other hand. I can imagine the Cro-Magnons studying the Neanderthal, perhaps surreptitiously at first, trying to understand, well what are these weird people doing? What is all this about? What are these strange rituals and practices, these ceremonies, this dancing, this singing that they were observing. What is this all about? Cro-Magnons could not necessarily understand what was going on, they tried to figure out what was going on, what was very alien to them.

Stan Gooch:

Cro-Magnon and Neanderthal did not interbreed peacefully, in my opinion. Basically it was Cro-Magnon raping Neanderthal women, that’s how we arose and that’s why it says in the Old Testament, When the Sons of God came into the Daughters of Men, these were the Mighty Men of Old. Their offspring were the Mighty Men of Old. Sons of God, Cro-Magnon, male, daughters of men, a her, female, Neanderthal. It was Cro-Magnon raping Neanderthal women, in my opinion which produced us.

Robert M. Schoch:

Our culture, our religious impulses, many of our institutions, societal institutions are really a combinations of Neanderthal institutions, our religious aspects if you want to call it that, and Cro-Magnons. That the Cro-Magnons really adopted, or inherited, or actually took over many Neanderthal concepts, then many Neanderthal mental innovations. For instance maybe symbolism, religious ceremonies, many of what in a most deep seated way make up our culture, make up our identity as we see it today.

Stan Gooch:

A lot of our culture and our beliefs, and our disbeliefs, come from Neanderthal, so we’ve incorporated much of the Neanderthal material into our lives. Now, in particular, picking on this in particular, I maintain that the story of Christ, and the resurrection, all of it, is simply a distorted version of the ancient Moon religion. Crucified on the Cross, the Cross is the symbol of the Moon in all pre-Christian cultures world-wide. He’s crucified on Friday, which is Friars Day, she’s the Moon Goddess, he resurrected on Monday, which is Moon Day. He’s resurrected 3 days later, then he dies, now 3 is important for several reasons in the Moon culture. One is the Moon has three colors, white, red and black. So the Moon has three colors, and what’s more important that that? Oh yeah, the other thing of course is that Earth, Moon and Sun are considered to be Mother, Father, Child. The Earth is the Child, the Daughter that, the Daughter of the Sun and the Moon. That was part of the Moon religion, so the three for several reasons. Christ is said to be born in the 25th of December, and that’s three days, did you say three, three days after the shortest day. When the Sun is reborn every year, after the Moon sacrifices him on the shortest day, she sacrifices him and then resurrects him, so that life can continue.

Narrator:

Could the Story of Jesus Christ be based on a far older story of Neanderthal rituals? Could our most cherished religious beliefs originate with the Neanderthal? Such as the concepts we have of immortality and resurrection? Could the Bible be an actual historical source that has preserved some of the Neanderthal wisdom, preserving it for us in a veiled form?

Ralph Solecki an archaeologist who worked at the Smithsonian Institution went to do an excavation in Northern Iraq in a cave called Shanidar. What he discovered, he published in a book called Shanidar, the First Flower People. In the cave of Shanidar, Solecki discovered 9 Neanderthal skeletons, the most ever found in one cave. During the excavations that took many years to uncover, Solecki discovered something extraordinary that change completely the perception of Neanderthal up to that point. This was 1971. What he discovered was a burial with flowers. The Neanderthals had buried their dead with seasonal flowers. That also had medicinal purposes. This was quite shocking to discover. The compassion of these people, and the fact that they believe in an afterlife. The flowers found in the Shanidar Cave are found in Bucegi. It was a spring burial with flowers that were white, violet and yellow.

In his excavations, Solecki discovered other thing that changed our perception of Neanderthal. He discovered the skeletons of handicapped and old people, so it meant that the Neanderthal had to take care of their sick and their old. Isn’t that such a human touch? Solecki called the Neanderthals, people with such good characters, we should be proud to have them as our ancestors. This is a far cry from the view of Neanderthal held for most of this century, that they were a brutal subspecies of humans. In light of recent evidence, Neanderthal emerges shockingly close to a modern human, a sensitive, highly intelligent creature, with a well developed culture and a well developed sense of self. Like any good scientific theory, Gooch’s ideas are subject to testing and further observation.

Two hours walking distance from the Sphinx, there is a cave called The Bear Cave, because a lot of cave bear remains have been found here as well as Neanderthal tools and two Neanderthal hearths. It is possible, I believe, that the Neanderthals used this cave not only for living, but they used it to preform rituals.

Daniel Ruzo considered that every else in the world, the legends and the sculptures had been forgotten, but here in the Carpathian Mountains of Romania the legends keep alive the memory. A legend called the Ialomita Cave, collected by the Romanian Queen Elizabeth, talks about an old Magician, an old Wizard, who was isolated here, who lived in seclusion, and who practiced herbal medicine and was very, very knowledgeable.

Another legend talks about Zumakasis (sp?).

Robert M. Schoch:

The cult of Zumakasis, this was recorded by the ancient Greek historian Herodotus, but clearly goes back to much more ancient times. I suspected it actually goes back to Neanderthal times.

Narrator:

And when he emerged, he was designated God of Immortality, and of the night.

Robert M. Schoch:

It was clearly a cult that believed in immortality, that there was something beyond physical death, that there was something beyond the material existence, there was something that we might call a soul that would continue, that would survive. This is actually not a belief that the ancient Greeks for instance had, but it seems to have been a belief that the Neanderthals had.

Narrator:

The Bats Cave has not been properly excavated since the 1950’s, when Neanderthal remains had been found here.

The evidence in the Carpathian Mountains shows that a Neanderthal cave bear ritual is 75,000 years old. The oldest in the world.

Robert M. Schoch:

Its important in my mind to carry out new excavations, not looking for just the same old, same old, but also looking for new evidence, with a new view, a new frame of mind.

No flowers have been found yet with any other prehistoric burials. We offer the suggestion here, that up to this time, no one has looked for the evidence.

Narrator:

In early August, I returned to Bucharest to welcome a very special guest.

A large temple with hundreds of altars with gigantic towers covered in snow with hundreds of years of kneeled upon stones and shadows petrified.

-The Confession of an Undefeated Man, Dr. Marcian Bleahu

A lost altar?

Between 2010-2012 Dr. Robert M. Schoch arrives to investigate first hand the rock formations and caves in the Carpathian Mountains.

The Bear Cave

Robert M. Schoch:

Even today, I found, for instance here’s a tooth. The remains of a, of a tooth. It looks to me like a pretty big, bear, ancient bear, you can see the crown. It looks to me like a molar tooth. But to just be coming here and be looking for a few minutes and finding it right on the surface.

Oana Ghiocel with Dr. Robert Schoch in Cave

Narrator:

There’s not only one type of ritual they found with cave bears, that different formations, different arrangements, so…

Robert M. Schoch:

So you have a…

Narrator:

That implies a complexity of thinking…

Robert M. Schoch:

Exactly, different rituals maybe for different things, so there are variations on a theme, there’s a continuity, there’s a connection, but there’s also the variations. So it shows a real complexity.

So here you have a connection, I think, at least anthropomorphic, a human connection between caves on the one hand, and stone sculptures on the other hand.

I find this absolutely amazing. Everyone looks at one side of the Sphinx and sees a face there, looks like a modern face, but if you walk around to the other side, look what we have… this is a face…

Narrator:

We have an (inaudible) looking face…

Robert M. Schoch:

Exactly but looks like a Neanderthal. The Neanderthal face with the big eye sockets, low forehead. You can see the mouth and the nose here, and notice, I think this is very telling, very important, the way it’s facing. This face is looking towards the West, and we’re hear in the evening and the Sun is setting. Look how the Sun is lined up.

Narrator:

Direct line to the eye.

Robert M. Schoch:

Direct line to the eye. This Neanderthal type face is looking towards the West, it looking towards the setting Sun, now it’s been speculated, that Neanderthals were a more nocturnal species, if that’s the case, what Sun would they be interested in, the setting Sun, the Sun that sets as they come out for their nocturnal activities, their ceremonies, their rituals, so they would not be looking towards the East as many modern cultures do, but towards the West, the setting Sun , which would be significant and important to them because essentially that would start their day, that would start their ceremonies, and here we have a Neanderthal like face looking towards the setting Sun.

Yeah looking at this face, as a geologist, looking at the different types of rock, you’ve got several different layers of rock. You’ve got more fine sandstone, you’ve got conglomerates, you’ve got rocks that are set within the rock that’s all natural. Like these pink rocks and these darker blackish rocks, and then you have what looks like a little hat on top of it, which is a slightly different rock a different lithology again. So you’ve got very complex interplay of different rock types, and that’s all natural. Then, you have them shaped into this face, this profile, and that’s why I start to wonder. Is that totally natural erosional features, or is there the possibility, that it started to look like a face, because of natural erosional features, is it possible that maybe people came, they pecked away at it, they modified it a little bit, to look more like a face. We know from other places that does happen. Now, when I’ve walked around this, looked at it closely, it’s so badly eroded that its, I would say, virtually impossible to tell, at this point, if there’s any kind of artificiality to it. There could have been, I can’t say for certain, but I think more importantly, in a way, it doesn’t matter cause you’ve got this profile, you’ve got this structure. It’s clearly recognizable as a face, as a human profile. When you walk around to the other side, you’ve got another clearly recognizable profile, they’re oriented in important directions, this one toward the North, the other face, that looks more Neanderthal, toward the West. That’s significant in both cases, so whether they’re natural, or whether they’re artificial, or some combination of both, I can see that they were incredibly important. They would have attracted attention in ancient times, just as they do now. Many sacred sites around the world are natural, and they’re maybe even considered more sacred because they are natural, they’re from nature, they’re from the Gods.

Narrator:

Exactly, so it looks like a miracle.

Robert M. Schoch:

That’s right, that’s right, that’s right.

Narrator:

The natural rock has a shaped of a face or animal.

Robert M. Schoch:

Exactly, so this…

Narrator:

Without any… human touch…

Robert M. Schoch:

Any human touch, any artificiality. So in some ways, one could argue, that if this is fully natural, it’s even more spectacular, even more important because, it’s an indication of something that could be from the Gods scared divinity.

Narrator:

Exactly, jf this is completely natural, I’m a lot more impressed and moved than if it was sculpted by the hand of man.

Robert M. Schoch:

So, I see this as a huge head, but really only the upper portion of the head, what I call the emerging head, and if you look at it, this to me looks like a nose. So, you’ve got a nose starting here, huge nose. You’ve got an eye socket here, and then above the eye socket the brow ridge, and then a low forehead, and what’s interesting is this forehead is not like a modern forehead. It’s much lower, the whole skull, the whole head is pulled back, elongated toward the back portion, which to me says, this is a Neanderthal head.

Oana Ghiocel with Robert Schoch at the Carpathian Sphinx

Narrator:

Yeah…

Robert M. Schoch:

It’s not a modern head, but it’s a Neanderthal head or Neanderthal face emerging from the bedrock.

Narrator:

Exactly, on top of the face.

Robert M. Schoch:

Yeah, its like its being born from the bedrock and so, not only do you have this face, this emerging head, which I think it very recognizable. Neanderthals would have recognized it, but you also have, look what we’re standing on. Sort of this staging area, right in front of it, which I think could have been used for ritual purposes, ceremonies, initiations. It would make a perfect place. It’s like a, I don’t want to call it an alter, but a stage, where things could take place, with the backdrop of the head. Here on this area, on the front of the emerging head, where I’ve suggested that ceremonies and rituals may have been taking place, look what we have. What this is, is sort of a scooped out area.

Narrator:

It’s almost a round…

Robert M. Schoch:

Yeah, its a round sort of basin area, if you put your hand in it, it’s filled with rain water now and sentiment. It’s actually quite deep and…

Narrator:

It’s very deep, and I’m not really touching here.

Robert M. Schoch:

Yeah, it’s quite deep, yeah it’s just sentiments, that’s collected in modern times. What I think we have here is really a depression or a basin area, that would have been perfect for ritualistic purposes, for different ceremonial purposes, it may have started out as a natural depression, but I believe it was probably enhanced by people rubbing it, scratching it. You see in more recent ancient sites, from only a few thousand years ago, say at temple complexes in Egypt, in Turkey, places where people will rub the rock, they’ll scrape it. It makes depressions, their trying to get the sacredness, the power from that scared site, this may have been formed initially the same way. Formed this depression, this now serves for ceremonial purposes.

Narrator:

How many people would you need to create something like this?

Robert M. Schoch:

Oh a lot if you’re scraping like that over a very long period of time.

Narrator:

Thousands of thousands…

Robert M. Schoch:

Of generations potentially, if they’re doing it by hand and rubbing it or scraping it, scraping away at it. But what you have it, you’ve got this depression, this basin that could be used for any number of purposes. Maybe it was filled with water and used for some kind of cleansing ritual. Maybe it was used for some kind of sanctified or holy water, we still have those concepts today. Either cleansing rituals as you go into a sacred place or holy water that brings the power of the scared site, and let’s you ingest it or maybe sprinkle it on yourself. Baptism we still use water, from a basin, from a depression. Maybe it was used to collect some kind of sacrifice for the Gods, maybe it was filled with liquid, maybe some kind of drink, maybe it was used to collect blood, if there were sacrifices of animals.

We saw a little bit higher that basin area, that may have been used for ceremonial purposes, to me this is very similar. This is not a basin, possibility it was at one point, if this is eroded back, in more recent times. You can see there’s some breakage there, but what looks like an area that eroded out you can put you hand…

Narrator:

I really can. I’m not reaching the end…

Robert M. Schoch:

No it goes way back.

Narrator:

It’s probably up to..

Robert M. Schoch:

At least back to there, and what it looks to me like, is a place where people may have been scraping at it, removing material. It’s a slightly different rock here in the general matrix. It would have attracted attention, you see it’s sort of an orangish, reddish, but like you see at other sacred sites, of more recent origin, it may have been a place where people scratched it to try to get a little bit of powder, a little bit… um, they essentially the power the sacred power of this spot.

Another feature that is on the plateau that really struck me, is what we could call the bearded head, the bearded mans head. It’s a huge structure, very powerful, very moving in my mind, and I suspect that whether its natural, or artificial, or some combination of both, this is something that may have survived from a very long time ago, geologically and may have moved people and been recognized by people, specifically Neanderthals, before the end of the last ice age. That they would have recognized this as looking like a face, as a bearded face, just like we do now. It almost looks to me like what some people image of God is. You know a Judeo-Christian bearded male figure. Interesting that you find it up in the Mountains, when you’re approaching, it seems to be, in my mind the place of the scared ritualistic setting…

I’m told that the name that’s been given to it is the Mechid, that’s a name that goes back, we don’t know exactly how long, but it’s called the Mechid, loosely translates as “the Church” and this suggests right away that there’s something special about this area.

The Mechid

What is the Mechid? It’s this incredible limestone formation, huge formation, incredibly symmetrical, and it appears to me, as if it were a stage or a podium, but of enormous scale. A scale I think of Giants, it’s a huge scale and it’s symmetrically arranged, it itself is symmetrical and it sits in a little valley area, that forms in my mind a natural amphitheater. This I can’t help but to think would form a perfect stage for ceremonies, for ritual practices, for initiation, for other types of sacred and religious practices.

In fact, maybe at night it would be even more dramatic if there were huge bonfires on the Mechid, if various trees like evergreen trees were thrown on to bonfires, then sparked up like fireworks, if there was drumming, if there was singing, music, voices.

So, I think this could be a very powerful setting for ceremonial purposes. All the pieces, in my mind come together here to suggest that this is a central location.

The river the ancient name for the river, which respectively originates at the Mechid, is sometimes interpreted or translated as Divine River or the Heavenly River, so here we have more allusions to the Divine, to the sacred, but there’s still more. On one side of the Valley, the rock formations, the rock peak, is referred to as the Origin Peak, or the Beginning Peak, this suggests to me a religious connotation of the origins of the Universe, the Cosmos, of people. How did things originate, sort of in a Judo-Christian sense, a Genesis. How did life itself, and the Universe, the Cosmos originate. On the other side of the Valley, the formations are known as the Goddesses, reference to Divinity, especially if we’re talking about Neanderthals. They put a lot of emphasis on Women and Goddesses, so we’ve got the Goddesses, the Origins, the Mechid, we’ve got the Heavenly or Divine River and then if we keep going further North, beyond the Mechid, to the highest peak, we have the Peak of the Human Being. Which suggests to me the origins of life, the origins of of humanity. Processions would be carried on, going up the river valley, from the South, up toward the Mechid, as you ascend up the river valley, toward the plateau, you find the Mechid as a very central location. There’s nothing else like this in the vicinity, there’s nothing else like this in the area, there’s nothing like this potentially in all of Europe. So, perhaps this was a focal point a gathering place for ancient Neanderthal people from a very broad geographic region.

I could see this very much as a gathering place for sacred rituals, for ceremonies. In fact, as I’ve looked at the maps, as I’ve looked at the geology and the topography, the geography of this region, you don’t have anything like this anywhere else. You don’t have a place that’s at high altitude, where from below it looks like huge mountain peaks. In fact, we’re in the Carpathian Mountains, but then when you get up to the top, it’s like a fortress and it opens up into this plateau.

Narrator:

And in the middle of the fortress, there is this natural or artificial feature.

Robert M. Schoch:

Structures like this … here it is… so this would be a gathering point, I see it very much as a gathering point,  a ceremonial point, and I wonder as I think about how wide-spread the populations were that would gather here periodically, because there’s no other area that’s as well suited as this, for I believe, hundreds of kilometers. So, we’re talking Neanderthal culture and consistent rituals over a large geographic area, consistent beliefs, shared beliefs, shared religious ceremonies. Periodically they would gather to exchange stories, to participate in ceremonies that would bond different communities together. I think this is the perfect spot for that.

We know that there’s a strong Neanderthal presence here. We have a number of caves, caves that occur along the river valley, as you ascend up towards the Mechid and up towards the plateau. These caves, to this day, preserve evidence of Neanderthal presence, evidence of Neanderthal rituals.

Narrator:

The anthropoid face of the Sphinx looks towards the West, to the Old Lady Mountain. Inside that mountain, there is a cave, considered sacred for a very long time. Robert and I, we go to investigate.

Ialomita Cave

This is the Bear Hole.

Robert M. Schoch:

Oh Ok.

Narrator:

Very echoy, the perfect place for some type of musical ceremony.

Robert M. Schoch:

I mean maybe they were ritual feasts in a chamber like this.

Narrator:

What’s the behavior, What’s the behavior of Ice Age bears?

Robert M. Schoch:

Right, and also…

Narrator:

Could it be natural for, would they all come, would so many of them come here to, to die?

Robert M. Schoch:

Yeah, yeah, yeah, they just all decide to come here when they were about to die.

Narrator:

It’s also possible, that perhaps they were used in rituals?

Robert M. Schoch:

That’s what I’m thinking, they’d be using cave bears.

Narrator:

Yes, this place was used, was used for performance, it would make a lot of sense that they have the dancing bears.

Beautiful!

Robert M. Schoch:

Really incredible space. It’s amazing!

Narrator:

I don’t know, for me it creates an experience that’s pretty extraordinary, really moving, but it’s hard to find the right words.

Robert M. Schoch:

Yeah. Yeah, yeah, yeah. It’s not easily put in language.

See, I’m wondering how they physically hauled past this point.

Narrator:

Cause the path is 20 meters down and the river is…

Robert M. Schoch:

The river is going through that pass…

Narrator:

Yeah, and here you’d be almost the same as there.

Robert M. Schoch:

See what I’m saying, where would they be walking, unless they’re walking right in the river.

Narrator:

That’s one of the things, they would be walking in the river.

Robert M. Schoch:

People could have been coming from many, even hundreds of kilometers or more away, gathering at certain times. Maybe this was something that happened every few years, maybe it was even major ceremonies that occurred once in a generation, and it was a pilgrimage. We can very much imagine, and I think it’s more than just imagination. We can reconstruct, start to reconstruct, how such pilgrimages occurred, and what practices would have been carried out along the way. Maybe initiations were carried out along these, along the passage. Getting up to the plateau.

We are really the combination in many ways, of both Neanderthals and Cro-Magnons and one question is, can we successfully integrate these two aspects. Arguably, Neanderthals were much closer to nature, they understood how they fit into nature much better than Cro-Magnons.

Bats Cave

Narrator:

The overall experience of one going into this cave would be similar for a Neanderthal as for us?

Robert M. Schoch:

Oh I think very similar. I had an incredible experience here.

Narrator:

Especially if they had better night vision.

Robert M. Schoch:

I think they had better night vision, and also, um what were they using for illumination? Even with really good vision, they had to have some kind of illumination. What’s this, what are the acoustics in here?

Narrator:

Oh, well… OHHH, OHHHHH

Robert M. Schoch:

Clap!

Narrator:

OHHHH, OHHHHHHHHHHHHHH

Robert M. Schoch:

That’s pretty good.

Narrator:

This place could be used for some sort of music rituals.

Robert M. Schoch:

It worked well. You’ve got good acoustics potentially, you’ve got sort of a natural chimney, you’ve got water that you could channel through. You probably keep a fairly, temperature wise, fairly close tolerances year round naturally.

Narrator:

Yeah.

Robert M. Schoch:

A perfect place to live.

Narrator:

It creates very interesting shapes, all of a sudden… things start to emerge.

Robert M. Schoch:

Yeah, yeah isn’t that amazing, just one candle.

Narrator:

For me, I don’t know for you, everything is a lot more organic and alive.

Robert M. Schoch:

Yeah, I agree, I agree, because I think the harsh headlamps and flashlights, they, they sort of flatten everything. You don’t see the texture from it, it washes things out.

Narrator:

Imagine now, a ceremony here.

Robert M. Schoch:

Yeah, yeah.

Narrator:

A musical performance.

Robert M. Schoch:

Oh, yeah. With things like pine trees and what not, if you brought in the pine branches, you know if you light them, all of a sudden for a short period of time, its like fireworks.

Narrator:

Exactly.

Robert M. Schoch:

And I could see them doing things like that for dramatic effect and at certain times. You know during a ceremony. I bet a lot of the hearths and the fire remains that are found, had nothing do to with warmth. It was probably ritualistic, I mean they didn’t need heat. They were used to the climate.

Narrator:

Exactly, and they would have fur.

Robert M. Schoch:

And they would have fur, and what not, in fact, if anything, I could say that you know, during these rituals, they might have been over heated, because they’re nocturnal. You know because fires get really hot like that and if you’re used to the natural climate and you know relatively cold conditions, then that’s what is normal for you. You wouldn’t want to be building these huge fires, just to get really hot and go back out again into the really cold.

Narrator:

If you build a huge fire, then also with the fur, you’d be boiling. That is the traditional image you see everywhere, with Neanderthals

Robert M. Schoch:

Huddling around the fire, and…

Narrator:

All around the fire wearing furs.

Robert M. Schoch:

Yeah, its probably not the case at all.

Christmas traditions, which of course are way pre-Christian, you know bringing in the tree, bringing in the what do you call it, wreaths and vines, and .. that goes back a hundred thousand years or more..

Narrator:

This was covered with ice, the caves that we are going to see in a bit were probably covered by glaciers.

Robert M. Schoch:

Or on the edge of a glacier somehow.

The Bear Cave

Robert M. Schoch:

So, this is the Bear Cave, reminds me of a pyramid, in the sense of the height. Oh, you know, I bet the floor may have been lower back then, yeah there’s deposits inside here.

Oh, yeah I can see it, more and more beautiful.

Oh, wow. It’s like a cathedral, you don’t get, at least I don’t, get this feel from a “real church” modern church.

Narrator:

So, it makes so much sense that this would be, like you said before, a ritual cave.

Robert M. Schoch:

I’m thinking that they were bringing crystals or special stones I think to they probably take them out, they use them more, I’m even thinking that if they were using some kind of crystals or whatnot they might bring them in, sort of sanctify them, if I could put it that way. Then they would take them with them, so it’s not like we would expect them to leave their valuables just laying about for us to find later, you know.

The Bear Cave in Romania by Candle Light

Narrator:

It’s stunning.

Robert M. Schoch:

Those are really stunning.

Narrator:

What a beautiful environment.

Robert M. Schoch:

Yeah… this is really interesting how it works.

Narrator:

A few candles, and a few crystals and suddenly you have an extraordinary, unexpected experience away from modern life and time.

What do you think about this setting with about, with about 15 candles?

Robert M. Schoch:

Yeah, it’s beautiful. This is the first Church, sanctuary or cathedral or whatever you want to call it.

Narrator:

Pretty much, it has the feel of a cathedral.

Robert M. Schoch:

Yeah, I mean I think the modern, artificial churches and cathedrals, they’re trying to imitate this. Now visa verse.

Narrator:

Yes, makes me feel religion, but not… in a very deep, deep and personal sense.

Robert M. Schoch:

Yeah, not like an organized religion, but a real deep feeling of sanctity and spirituality I would say.

You go into a cathedral in many cases, one that not, that’s not illuminated by modern lighting, but the more traditional way, with very subdued lighting, essentially in my mind you’re going to an artificial cave. I think that that many of the churches and cathedrals we see now, from medieval or renaissance times for instance, are actually a legacy, a legacy of the cave. The cave being used as a ritualistic site, some of these legacies may go back tens of thousands of years.

I suspect for Neanderthal culture, for Neanderthal civilization, maybe the single most important thing, the most central point, was their religion. What is now called religion, I’m not sure they would have used that term, because it may have been so all encompassing for them, that it was well beyond what we think of religion now in a modern, Western sense, but the religiosity, the mental world that they developed and we’ll call it religious/magical sense, and they may have been incredibly sophisticated, incredibly developed, I think possibly well beyond where we are today. The Cro-Magnons , I would speculate, tried to put it into simplistic terms, well what’s going on with these other people, these Neanderthals. Who are they? We can really understand what’s going on, so we try to categorize it in simple terms, sometimes it’s black, sometimes it’s white. Sometimes they’re doing good things, sometimes they’re doing bad things, and our modern concept of things like a Good God, a Bad Devil, Angles verses Satan, may have come from a simplistic Cro-Magnon understanding of much more subtle, much more nuanced, Neanderthal rituals and religion. I suspect that for Neanderthals, it wasn’t a simple category of Good on one side, and Bad on the other side, or what we would call God and Devil. It may have been much more nuanced. It may have seemed that you need both aspects, I even think of ancient religions in a classical sense, for instance ancient Egyptians. They did not make the same distinction between good and bad as modern society often does. They realized that for the working of the Cosmos, the Universe, in a general sense, as they saw it. There had to be both good and bad, there had to be both sides, what we would call good and bad. They were just two ends of a continuous spectrum, and I suspect that Neanderthals saw a lot of grey area also.

Stan Gooch:

I would say, well we’ve got to accept that we are, you know, Neanderthal and Cro-Magnon in one. It’s not easy to do.

Robert M. Schoch:

What we really have to do, is to take our duel aspects, our Cro-Magnon aspects, our Neanderthal aspects and combine them, so that neither overpowers the other, hit a balance between them and if we can do that successfully, we may in fact, create something that rises above either.

Narrator:

It could have been some sort of ritual or pilgrimage that would come here. Sort of a returning, returning to the beginning.

Robert M. Schoch:

Yeah, maybe certain times of year, or maybe, there may even be times that, even bigger groups got together on a more lengthy cycle. Cyclical, maybe you know, based on a lunar cycle of, what is it, the 19 year return, or something like that, which was essentially the generational thing. You might have a huge sort of congregation…

Narrator:

Hundreds or possibly thousands of people.

Robert M. Schoch:

Yeah, yeah, which would have been, you can visualize, would have been really amazing.

Narrator:

It’s something that makes it very intimate and personal.

Robert M. Schoch:

Yeah, yeah.

Narrator:

At the same time it’s also very public, and communal, but it’s also very private.

Robert M. Schoch:

Yeah, it’s reminding me of being in the caves, so you’re getting almost the intimacy here, but then you can go out and… it sort of ties them together.

Narrator:

It’s almost as if, yeah, like I said the shock, they were bringing out whatever, and you’re exposing it, to the people in the community and to the nature.

Robert M. Schoch:

Exactly, it really does look like it, and cause our civilization is, it’s based on such triviality.

Narrator:

It seems today, we are missing something vital to our human well being. We are missing that deep connection with nature, that Neanderthals had so well developed. How would rediscovering Neanderthal values impact our civilization today? What will this new awareness bring to our lives?

They lived around the mountains, and carved into them. They appreciated the natural beauty and had high mental abilities, Ruzo called them the guardians of an ancient wisdom. It was a magical work, done by a culture whose science and understanding of the world was different from the present.

Robert M. Schoch:

I think modern society are people, in modern society, are afraid to deal with a lot of things. I think their almost a terrible stereotype or generalization, but they’re afraid to deal with anything that’s really meaningful

It’s not a given that a culture has to be materialistic.

Narrator:

Archeologist Ralph Solecki’s ended his book Shanidar, the First Flower People, saying, in the face of the growing evidence, we will be forced to accept Neanderthal as our real human ancestor.

Robert M. Schoch:

And so you have this dichotomy between religion and intuition with Neanderthals, and reason and logic with Cro-Magnons, and Stan Gooch, says that it was sort of monumental when the two met. Also, you had two different world views coming together, neither really understood the other, so the Neanderthal didn’t really understand these new Cro-Magnons that were invading their territory. The Cro-Magnons didn’t really understand what the Neanderthals were doing with all these weird rituals, and ceremonies, and dancing and singing. That was foreign to them, they tried to figure it out, what they called magic.

Narrator:

Exactly, they probably, how would you see these rituals? They would have to spy at night.

Robert M. Schoch:

Yeah, try to figure out what’s going on. It must have been very mysterious, very scary to the Cro-Magnons, to see these people doing all these things. You know, when you don’t understand something you fear it, in many cases. Much of our culture…

Narrator:

And our beliefs.

Robert M. Schoch:

And our beliefs. That’s inherited from Neanderthal so we in that cultural sense, carry on many Neanderthal traditions.

Narrator:

Erik Trinkaus a leading Neanderthal expert, is convinced that a cult of immortality was invented by the Neanderthals. He thinks the Neanderthals were the first ones to practice burials, and that Homo Sapiens and Cro-Magnon learned how to bury the dead from the Neanderthals. He observed how they buried, and how they did their practices, and so he copied them.

Daniel Ruzo had said, that the Carpathian Mountains were at the center of the oldest Europe Civilization known today. The first age, was the age of truth and knowledge. The people lived around the mountains with pyramidal summits, and carved into them for us, for the future generations, signaling the caves.

Reading from “Zamolxis, The Vanishing God” by Mircea Eliade

The cave represents the other world, but also the entire Universe, it is a place that, its a world…

Robert M. Schoch:

It’s a world in itself. The ritual cave, sometimes imitates the night sky. In other words, it is a mago mandi, a Universe in miniature. Living in a cave does not necessarily imply going down among the shades, it can as well imply living in a different world, a world that’s vaster, more complex, because it incorporates various modes of existence and hence is full of riches, and countless virtualities.

Daniel Ruzo’s Words:

Here in the mountains of Romania lies the plot of men, the subterranean tunnels where humanity saved itself during the flood. These are the caverns of the treasure, referred to in so many world legends.

Robert M. Schoch:

The Egyptian Sphinx is part of a larger complex, just like the Carpathian Sphinx is part of a larger complex, so in both cases, I believe we’re talking sacred, ceremonial sites that held incredible importance to their respective people, to their respective populations.

Daniel Ruzo’s Words:

It is in these sacred mountains where people found their salvation, after the flood, and where they will be saved when the next catastrophe occurs. It is vital today to find these sacred mountains and sacred caves.

Robert M. Schoch:

They and other ancient, you know certain other ancient peoples, but we’ll focus on Neanderthals for now, are much more sophisticated, in ways that we don’t even have a good language to describe. I mean you have traditions around the world, of a Golden Age, which I think is not referring to a materialistic Golden Age.

Our civilization has progressed one way, materialistically, and that type of sophistication we’ve plummeted. To judge a culture like the Neanderthals by the scanty remains, the physical remains, it’s, it’s sort of insane.

In fact, Neanderthals with their traditions, with their concepts, they were the pioneers.

Looking at the Universe with it’s cosmic rhythms, untold beauty and great dangers, they understood themselves as part of something bigger than they themselves were. They new their place in the order of things. We need to recover that sense of the world.

Narrator:

In waking up to the new paradigm, we recover something long lost, something very old in ourselves.

Reading from “Beyond Scenery” by Marcian Bleahu

Narrator:

When you climb a mountain, you go with humility and devotion, as in a cathedral, where you enter not to conquer a creed, but to rediscover yourself, to rediscover something inside yourself, hidden for so long, that awaits to be awakened.

Both:

When you climb a mountain you go with humility and devotion as in a cathedral, where you enter not to conquer a creed, but to rediscover yourself, to rediscover something inside yourself, hidden for so long, that awaits to be awakened.

Robert M. Schoch:

Here’s a setting where, effectively in the mythology, in the religious beliefs, humans may have originated. Maybe this was the most important, the most sacred, the most central location for Neanderthal populations as whole.

Its as if you’re approaching an incredible cathedral, an incredibly holy spot and as you approach it, you come to various points where you prepare yourself for the ultimate adventure, the ultimate religious experience at the highest peaks. So, this entire complex, which, in many ways is symbolized by the Carpathian Sphinx is a huge religious, ceremonial, ritualistic complex that must have been incredibly important to the Neanderthal people for generations and generations, probably thousands and thousands of generations, over tens of thousands of years.

Really important to me to come here and experience first hand the caves, to experience first hand the plateau, to experience first hand the Carpathian Sphinx. To me in fact, in some ways we can think of the Carpathian Sphinx as being a symbol for a lost world, literally a lost people, a lost culture, the mountain is a lost cathedral and the Carpathian Sphinx is the lost alter.

Overlay:

The Neanderthal voices heard throughout this film are musical reconstructions by composer Simon Thorne based on the book “The Singing Neanderthals” (2005) written by Archeologist Steven Mithen

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